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Prostatitis: What is it?

Pelvic Pain

Prostatitis is inflammation of the prostate gland, a small organ of the male genital system located near the bladder and placed in close contact with the urethra.

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Prostatitis: What is it?

Introduction

Prostatitis: What is it?

Prostatitis is inflammation of the prostate gland, a small organ of the male genital tract located near the bladder and placed in close contact with the urethra.

The Types of Prostatitis

In addition to acute prostatitis of bacterial origin there are also:

Chronic prostatitis of bacterial origin;
Chronic prostatitis of non-bacterial origin;
Asymptomatic prostatitis.

It is worth reminding readers that the most recent classification of prostatitis distinguishes chronic non-bacterial prostatitis into two pathological subtypes: chronic inflammatory pelvic pain syndrome (type IIIA prostatitis) and chronic non-inflammatory pelvic pain syndrome (type IIIB prostatitis). ).

The subject of this article will be chronic prostatitis and the asymptomatic variant.

What is Chronic Non-Bacterial Prostatitis / Chronic pelvic pain ?

Chronic prostatitis of non-bacterial origin - otherwise known as chronic pelvic pain syndrome, type III prostatitis or even chronic abacterial prostatitis - is a gradual onset and persistent inflammation of the prostate that is not associated with the presence of bacterial infections local to the prostate gland ("non-bacterial" means the absence of ongoing bacterial infection).

Known and classified in the 1960s as prostatodynia ("prostat-" stands for "prostate" and "-odynia" for "pain"), chronic prostatitis of non-bacterial origin is the most common type of prostatitis in the male population: statistics, in fact, report that it constitutes 90-95% of the diagnoses of inflammation of the prostate gland.

As reported in the introduction, since 1999, doctors have distinguished two subtypes of chronic non-bacterial prostatitis: chronic inflammatory pelvic pain syndrome (or type IIIA prostatitis) and chronic non-inflammatory pelvic pain syndrome (or type IIIB prostatitis) .

Chronic Inflammatory Pelvic Pain Syndrome
Chronic non-bacterial prostatitis is called chronic inflammatory pelvic pain syndrome, as a result of which large quantities of white blood cells are present in the prostate fluid, sperm and urine; the presence of large quantities of white blood cells indicates an ongoing inflammatory state.

Chronic Non-Inflammatory Pelvic Pain Syndrome
Chronic non-bacterial prostatitis is called chronic non-inflammatory pelvic pain syndrome, as a result of which traces of white blood cells are present in the prostate fluid, sperm and urine; the small presence of white blood cells denotes a mild inflammation in progress.

Pelvic pain syndrome 
Chronic Non-Bacterial Prostatitis: A Muscular problem

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Pelvic Pain Syndrome - Chronic Non-Bacterial Prostatitis: the Causes?


For the time being, the precise causes of type III prostatitis are unclear; however, there is no lack of theories in this regard:

According to some experts, the cause of chronic prostatitis of non-bacterial origin, pelvic pain syndrome,  would be a problem in the perineal Muscle spams;


The skeletal muscles of the pelvic floor support and surround the bladder, prostate and rectum. Much as spasm of neck and shoulder muscles can lead to tension headaches, spasm of the pelvic floor can lead to genital pain and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

Pain can be felt in the penis, testicles, perineum (sensation of “sitting on a golf ball”), lower abdomen and lower back. Men may have post-ejaculatory pain and erectile dysfunction.1 Indeed, more than 50 percent of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and patients with interstitial cystitis have pelvic floor spasm on exam, which can be an independent driver of their ongoing symptoms.

The diagnosis is not difficult but does require a slight modification of the usual digital rectal exam. In men, the muscles of the pelvic floor can be palpated anteriorly to either side of the prostate and laterally during the rectal exam.